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Welcome to Petplan’s blog, a space where you can read up on the latest pet-news, find out interesting facts and tips about keeping your pets happy and healthy, and share your views on hot topics.

Cats changing colour - what it means

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Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: cat fleas colour fur condition

Q: The weirdest thing has been happening to our black cat - he has started to turn brown. He's nine years old and a rescue cat that we don't have much history on. Now and again he even leaves some brownish marks on his bed. Is this normal?

A: There are two possibilities here that could explain your cat's apparent colour changes. The first is fleas, or more accurately, flea excrement, which is dark brown/black in colour. It contains haemoglobin from consumed blood, which can stain clothes and bedding dark brown. Check the base of your cat's skin and look for small dark nuggets, picking them up with wet, white tissue. When rubbed between the fingers these should turn a reddish colour. Secondly, many black cats go for the sun-bleached look during the warmer months. This generally changes back to their darker hue as the winter nights begin to draw in and they shed their summer coat for the thicker winter one. If this is the case, your little cat will soon return to the sleek ebony black you remember.

Scott Miller, vet

Four canine 'superfood' for 2012

Four canine 'superfood' for 2012
Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: pet diet dog diet polydipsia
We’ve asked vet and nutrition columnist Alison Logan for her top “superfood” recommendations to help get your dog fit in 2012. The best news of all? A lot of them cost nothing…

Is your dog's incontinence a cause for concern?

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This article contains: dog urination incontinence

Q: My five-year-old Labrador's bedding is always damp in the morning. She is not overweight and gets plenty of exercise. What could be causing this?

A: The most likely cause of her damp bedding is small amounts of urine, as it is not uncommon for female dogs to become urinary incontinent as they get older. Sometimes associated with neutering, hormonal urinary incontinence results in leaky urinary sphincters (the smooth muscle valves involved with urinary control), leading to a dog who dribbles at night, when they are asleep and rely on involuntary control. As a first step, it is worth taking your dog and a urine sample into your vet clinic because, if diagnosed, this condition tends to be very well controlled with daily oral medications.

Scott Miller, vet

Pet owners: some quick ways to save money in 2012

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Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: cat dog pet diet toys holidays
Your beloved pet probably isn't that interested in the Eurozone crisis or a possible double-dip recession, but we're all into saving money these days. Here are some ideas on how to save cash when it comes to our pets'

How to tell if your cat has hyperthyroidism

How to tell if your cat has hyperthyroidism
Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: cat weight loss hyperthyroidism thyroid thirst
Could your cat have hyperthyroidism? We've asked vet and PetPeople columnist Alison Logan for her top five symptoms to look out for They're eating all the time, but still losing weightPolyphagia - weight loss despite an increased appetite - is a classic sign of feline hyperthyroidism. Your cat is ravenous, eating all the food you give them and demanding more, yet losing weight, and perhaps not the fussy cat she once was.
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