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Welcome to Petplan’s blog, a space where you can read up on the latest pet-news, find out interesting facts and tips about keeping your pets happy and healthy, and share your views on hot topics.

Dalmatians: everything you need to know, right here

Dalmatians: everything you need to know, right here
Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: dog breeds dalmatian
Dalmatians are not the best choice for first-time dog owners and are best suited to active people with a keen interest in training and behaviour. While they enjoy children's playfulness, as with any breed, they shouldn't be left alone with little ones as their unbridled exuberance may end in tears. Dalmatians are very active indoors; they will love a house with a large garden to run around in, but shouldn't be kept outside in the colder months. They'll appreciate a doggy buddy for when you leave the house, and should also get on with other pets they've grown up with.

Is your dog's grass eating a cause for concern?

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Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: dog vomiting eating grass
Q; My 18-month-old Border Terrier eats grass, which he brings back up. He seems fine afterwards. Why does he do this? A: This is fairly normal behaviour in many dogs, and it's thought that they do it to get nutrients lacking in their daily diet or

Cat's yowl keeping you up? Here's what to do

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Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: cat miaowing burmese
Q: My three-year-old Burmese yowls loudly at night, stopping us (and possibly our neighbours) from sleeping. What can we do? A: Burmese cats are a vocal breed. You mentioned that you shut him in for the night, but cats are crepuscular (twilight) hunters and he may want

How to help your anally incontinent cat

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Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: cat incontinent medication
Q: Our cat is anally incontinent. He is otherwise healthy and happy, and our vet has no idea of the cause. It's a real hygiene problem, especially as we have a baby in the house. What can we do? A: This is a difficult condition at the best of times but, with a baby in the house, a big problem. If your cat’s anal sphincter has lost tone suddenly, then it is probably the result of damage

Stopping your dog chewing - what you can do

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Posted on by Petplan
This article contains: dog warts chewing

Q: My dog won't stop chewing a small wart under his tail. He chews it constantly and makes it bleed. He's a grumpy old boy and can get obsessive. How can I stop him doing this?

A: There are some excellent inflatable collars, which will restrict your dog's ability to turn its head, but unlike the old lampshade collars, they won't restrict peripheral vision. Used for a few weeks with a course of antibiotics prescribed by your vet to clear up any infection, this may help to reduce your dog's wart and allow it to heal. However, surgery may be your best bet to remove it once and for all. Get a blood test first though, to check that your old dog is robust enough to undergo the anaesthetic.

Scott Miller, vet

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