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Vet Awards 2016

Petplan Veterinary Awards 2016

Petplan has worked closely with the veterinary profession for over 39 years and sees first hand each day the fantastic work that goes on in veterinary practices across the UK.

We recognise that keeping customers happy and pets healthy is a team effort from the receptionist and support staff right through to the vets and nurses themselves. These awards provide an opportunity for pet owners to recognise the hard work and dedication of veterinary staff and say 'thank you'.

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Shining a light on the amazing veterinary profession

Check out Petplan’s most unusual claims stories below to see how the veterinary profession help keep the nations pet’s healthy!

The dog allergic to foxes Kitten with vertigo The stressed rabbit The dog who ate contraceptive pills Tummy trouble for two

The dog allergic to foxes

Millions of us are allergic to our pets, but our pets being allergic to other animals is far less common. When Gryff the dog started displaying mysterious, itchy, mange-like sores, his owner guessed it was down to an allergic reaction, but had no idea what had caused it.

Having ruled out food allergies and atopy (allergies that result from allergens that are inhaled or come into contact with the skin), the vet narrowed it down to being a far less common, contact allergy. By a process of elimination, a fox allergy was diagnosed, caused by some furry intruders in Gryff’s garden. The garden has since been fox-proofed and Gryff has been allergy-free ever since.

The dog who ate contraceptive pills

Lenny the cocker spaniel was only four months old when he got a taste for adventure. It was his first time exploring upstairs when he suddenly disappeared.

His owner Katy found him looking shamefaced, peering round the door of the bedroom, where she saw a chewed up contraceptive pill packet lying on the floor. She counted five or six missing pills, and rushed him to the vets, who explained it would have been the sugary coating which attracted him.

The vet advised making Lenny sick and pieces of foil and plastic remnants were discovered. A couple of hours later, Lenny was home, and the pills were safely stored on a high shelf, out of a puppy’s reach.

The stressed rabbit

Mabel the rabbit had never really fitted the mould of being ‘timid as a rabbit’ so when she started displaying signs of nervousness - hunched up with ears flat against her body - her owner was concerned.

Puzzled by Mabel’s behavior and sudden lack of interest in food, her surroundings and general apathy, her owner arranged a visit to the vet. The vet immediately suspected that the issues were linked to stress, but it was Mabel’s lack of interest in food that set alarm bells ringing. A swift examination revealed a very bloated tummy and grinding of teeth which is indicative of pain – Mabel had an undetected gut problem. Gastrointestinal disorders can be life-threatening, so the vet moved quickly and prescribed effective medication that simultaneously cured the gut issue, which in turn eased the stress. Mabel has since led a peaceful and happy life thanks to her vet having focused on treating the cause of the issue, and not just the symptoms.

Kitten with vertigo

When Lucy’s family adopted their kitten, Fizzy, from Battersea Dogs and Cats Home, they were charmed by her adorably clumsy behaviour. She loved to run around and climb everything in sight, but would often fall over, and off fences and furniture, sometimes staggering around in circles. Thinking this was normal kitten behaviour, Lucy hoped ‘Dizzy Fizzy’ would eventually grow out of her accident-prone ways.

Lucy took Fizzy to the vet for her scheduled injections, and mentioned her clumsiness in the conversation, slightly worried that she could hurt herself if she kept falling over. The vet realised this behaviour didn’t sound completely normal. She carried out a blood test, X-rays and an ultra sound, and discovered Fizzy had an inner ear infection causing severe vertigo. Lucy was amazed and relieved to find a cure for her clumsy cat. The infection was easily treated with antibiotics, and soon Fizzy was a champion climber, scaling bookshelves with ease and always landing on her feet.

Tummy trouble for two

Show Jumper Charlotte Edwards had her horses tested for Gastric ulcers after the vet suggested it could contribute towards their quirky behaviour, and was shocked to find both Troy and Stan were suffering. "I've used Chiltern vets for over 10 years and despite the practice now being an hour away due to a house move I won’t change. They are so efficient. The vet Sarah Randall says it as it is and I fully trust her judgement on every occasion” comments Charlotte.

After treatment and a period of rest both Troy and Stan are back jumping and seem to be enjoying their work a lot more.

What are the award categories?

The 5 award categories are:

  • Practice of the Year
  • Practice Manager of the Year
  • Practice Support Staff of the Year
  • Vet Nurse of the Year
  • Vet of the Year

What should I say in my nomination?

Each pet owner will have their own individual reasons for why they think their practice or someone in the team deserves an award. Try to provide specific examples of what the practice or members of the team did to go above and beyond your expectations. What specifically did they do or say? How did they make you feel? What was it that made a difficult experience much more bearable for you or your pet?

How are these awards judged?

Nominations are judged by an independent panel of leading people from the veterinary industry including presidents of the veterinary and nursing associations and previous winners of these awards. These judges have first-hand experience of life in practice and are able to use their veterinary expertise to judge who the truly outstanding teams and individuals are from the thousands of nominations received each year. Petplan are not part of the judging panel.

When is the nomination period?

Nominations for the Veterinary Awards open in September and close on the 31st January 2016.

When are the winners announced?

Three finalists will be selected in each category and invited to attend a prestigious award ceremony in April 2016 where the winners will be announced.

To view videos of the 2015 winners click here.

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